Ford And Deisel Never
Intended Cars
To Use Gasoline

8-15-5
 

 

Henry Ford’s first Model-T was built to run on hemp gasoline and the CAR ITSELF WAS CONSTRUCTED FROM HEMP! On his large estate, Ford was photographed among his hemp fields. The car, ‘grown from the soil,’ had hemp plastic panels whose impact strength was 10 times stronger than steel; Popular Mechanics, 1941.
 
http://www.illuminati-news.com/marijuana-conspiracy.htm
 
Rudolf Diesel, the inventor of the diesel engine, designed it to run on vegetable and seed oils like hemp; he actually ran the thing on peanut oil for the 1900 World’s Fair. Henry Ford used hemp to not only construct cars but also fuel them.
 
As an alternative to methanol, hemp has at least one glowing report: the plant produces up to four times more cellulose per acre than trees. And a hemp crop grows a little quicker than a forest.
 
As for an alternative to petroleum…
 
Hemp grows like mad from border to border in America; so shortages are unlikely. And, unlike petrol, unless we run out of soil, hemp is renewable.
 
Growing and harvesting the stuff has much less environmental impact than procuring oil.
 
Hemp fuel is biodegradable; so oil spills become fertilizer not eco-catastrophes.
 
Hemp fuel does not contribute to sulfur dioxide air poisoning.
 
Other noxious emissions like carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons are radically slashed by using “biodiesel.
 
Hemp fuel is nontoxic and only a mild skin irritant; anybody who,s ever cleaned out an old carburetor with gasoline can confirm the same is not true for petrol.
 
Growing hemp for fuel would be a tremendous boon for American farmers and the agricultural industry, as opposed to people like, say, the Bush family.
 
And that,s why hemp might not go anywhere as a fuel alternative. Oil interests are big and donate likewise to politicians, and selling a man on an idea that will cost him more than he,ll benefit requires an amazingly skilled orator — or a gun. Unfortunately, unless you,re the federal government, gunpoint conversions are usually illegal. Ergo, PR is about the best bet right now.
 
There are many people working hard on this front, including the Hemp Car and its intrepid crew. Currently ginning up for a trans-America evangelism tour, the Hemp Car plans to spread the good word of hemp-fuel viability at stops in both the U.S. and Canada.
 
For whatever good it will do, they should make sure to stop by Washington, D.C., and have a word with President George W. Bush. The current oil crisis and our nation,s dependency on sometimes-persnickety foreign sources might find the new chief executive with an open mind to fuel sources other than Texas tea — regardless of his oily bank accounts. And, while salvaging his dad’s legacy is not Goal 1 for Dubya, it might also help him look more forward thinking in terms of energy policy and the environment.
 
Of course, hemp fuel may never take off. It might dry up like all those hemp crops left unattended after the feds banned their cultivation in the 1930s. One way or the other, Bush should consider freeing up the market to innovate with alternative fuels like hemp oil — it couldn,t hurt, and it stands the chance to help. In so doing, he,ll end his term with a far better moniker than the “environmental president.” For, if other policy decisions he makes go in a similar direction, we can perhaps call him the “free-market president.”
 
http://www.rockhawk.com/gasoline_and_hemp.htm
 
Fuel of the Future
 
When Henry Ford told a New York Times reporter that ethyl alcohol was “the fuel of the future” in 1925, he was expressing an opinion that was widely shared in the automotive industry. “The fuel of the future is going to come from fruit like that sumach out by the road, or from apples, weeds, sawdust — almost anything,” he said. “There is fuel in every bit of vegetable matter that can be fermented. There’s enough alcohol in one year’s yield of an acre of potatoes to drive the machinery necessary to cultivate the fields for a hundred years.”
 
Ford recognized the utility of the hemp plant. He constructed a car of resin stiffened hemp fiber, and even ran the car on ethanol made from hemp. Ford knew that hemp could produce vast economic resources if widely cultivated.
 
Ford’s optimistic appraisal of cellulose and crop based ethyl alcohol fuel can be read in several ways. First, it can be seen as an oblique jab at a competitor. General Motors had come to considerable grief that summer of 1925 over another octane boosting fuel called tetra-ethyl lead, and government officials had been quietly in touch with Ford engineers about alternatives to leaded gasoline additives. Secondly, by 1925 the American farms that Ford loved were facing an economic crisis that would later intensify with the depression. Although the causes of the crisis were complex, one possible solution was seen in creating new markets for farm products. With Ford’s financial and political backing, the idea of opening up industrial markets for farmers would be translated into a broad movement for scientific research in agriculture that would be labelled “Farm Chemurgy.” 2
 
Why Henry’s plans were delayed for more than a half century:
 
Ethanol has been known as a fuel for many decades. Indeed, when Henry Ford designed the Model T, it was his expectation that ethanol, made from renewable biological materials, would be a major automobile fuel. However, gasoline emerged as the dominant transportation fuel in the early twentieth century because of the ease of operation of gasoline engines with the materials then available for engine construction, a growing supply of cheaper petroleum from oil field discoveries, and intense lobbying by petroleum companies for the federal government to maintain steep alcohol taxes. Many bills proposing a National energy program that made use of Americas vast agricultural resources (for fuel production) were killed by smear campaigns launched by vested petroleum interests. One noteworthy claim put forth by petrol companies was that the U.S. government’s plans “robbed taxpayers to make farmers rich”.
 
http://www.hempcar.org/ford.shtml

 

 

 

 

 

There’s a new hemp trend sweeping the nation and it has nothing to do with thosebeaded friendship bracelets from the ’90s.

Twenty-three states have now enacted pro-industrial hemp legislation (Hawaii Governor Neil Abercrombie signed the latest bill this past week), making the cousin crop to marijuana a national phenomenon. Since the beginning of the year, more than 70 bills related to hemp have been introduced in more than half of the country’s states. Passage of the recent Farm Bill, which legalized the crop for research purposes, further cleared the way for industrial hemp production.

Hemp, which is the same species as marijuana (Cannabis sativa) but contains little to no THC, was grown widely in America before anti-drug sentiment helped make it unpopular in the 1950s. Today, however, the nation’s turning tide on marijuana means its “sober cousin” is also making a comeback.

Hemp policy is “not just turning a corner,” Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.) told The Huffington Post earlier this year. “It’s turning a corner and running downhill.”

So what’s with America’s new obsession with hemp? Below, 9 reasons this wonder crop is sweeping the nation, almost all of which are rooted in the crop’s sustainable and environmentally-friendly characteristics:

1. It’s a farmer’s best friend
Not only does hemp grow in a variety of climates and soil types, it also grows very tightly spaced (decreasing land use) and has a fast growing rate (which leads to high yields). Farmers in Canada are reportedly making $300-per-acre profits from growing hemp. Moreover, because the crop improves soil health (see below), farmers can grow food crops immediately after a hemp harvest without a fallow period.
hemp farmer

2. It’s an environmentalist’s best friend
Ever wonder where the nickname “weed” comes from? The hemp plant grows like one, obviating the need for most pesticides (it is naturally resistant to most pests), herbicides, fungicides and thriving on less water than most crops. Because of its resiliency, it has also been flagged as a natural way to clean up soil pollution. Using a process called phyto-remediation, hemp was used at Chernobyl to harmlessly extract toxins and pollutants from the soil and groundwater. Hemp actually absorbs CO2 while it grows through natural photosynthesis, making it carbon-negative from the get-go.
hemp field

3. It can compete with cotton
Hemp has been used as a fabric since time immemorial. As a textile, hemp is durable, comes in a variety of natural colors based on how it is processed from the plant, and has “a wonderful drape, comparable to linen,” according to Patagonia. Plus, it needs approximately half as much land and half as much water as cotton does to thrive.
hemp clothing

4. It’s a “superfood”
Hemp seeds are used in a variety of health foods, including hemp seed butters, hemp seed energy bars, hemp oil and even hemp seed milks. The seeds have a nutty flavor and are regarded as a superfood since they are high in omega-3 fatty acids and complete protein.
hemp food

5. It could save the trees
Hemp pulp has been used to create paper for at least 2,000 years, including a draft of the Declaration of Independence, but it is currently significantly pricier to process than wood pulp. If processing costs come down, however, hemp pulp could conceivably replace wood pulp, creating a more durable, sustainable and recyclable paper. Moreover, hemp’s low lignin content and naturally light color mean that fewer chemicals and less bleach would be needed to pulp and color hemp paper.
declaration of independence draft

6. It can be made into bio-fuel
A 2009 study from the University of Connecticut’s Biofuel Consortium found that hemp seed oil made a “viable and even attractive” feedstock for producing biodiesel. Hemp biodiesel proved to be high efficiency (97 percent of the hemp oil was converted to biodiesel) and could even be used at lower temperatures than other biodiesels.
biodiesel

7. We can make carbon-neutral buildings with it
Lovingly called “hempcrete,” hemp fiber can be mixed with lime to create carbon-neutral building supplies, including insulation, pressboard, flooring and wall construction. Hempcrete is energy-efficient, non-toxic and resistant to mold, insects and fire. Moreover, it is easier to work with than concrete and just as strong.
hemp technologies

8. It can replace plastic
Henry Ford famously built a car out of hemp & soy plastic in the early 1940s, and Lotus recently did the same. In 2008, the Lotus Eco Elise used hemp in its composite body panels and spoiler, and many car manufacturers have since switched to hemp composites for door panels, columns, seat backs, boot linings, floor consoles and instrument panels. Hemp composites are stronger, lighter and cheaper than fiber glass and carbon fiber — plus, they’re recyclable!
lotus eco elise

9. It could make America a lot of money
Currently, America imports most of its hemp seed and hemp oil from China and Canada. In 2011, the U.S. imported $11.5 million worth of hemp products, up from $1.4 million in 2000. With the laws against industrial hemp changing, however, the U.S. has a chance to create domestic jobs and capitalize on the growing market. Some estimates value the U.S. industrial hemp market at $500 million per year; Canada’s hemp industry is reportedly going to break a billion dollars this year in earnings.
farm money

Maybe we will even see a resurgence in hemp jewelry…

hemp bracelets

 

 

 

 

2 Comments

  1. get blackhat download
    October 31, 2014

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  2. Georgette Wallace
    December 26, 2014

    Fascinating information! I would love to try the hempcrete. I have played around with other building materials when working on an Earthship and a strawbale house and would love to try the hempcrete. Is it available anywhere yet?

    Reply

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